GHF STAFF

Global Heritage Fund’s staff is the nexus for all international development and conservation work we do throughout the world. Each member of the GHF staff brings his or her diverse skills and expertise to bear on the pressing problems of global heritage conservation.

Katerina Acuna

Development Associate

Katerina Acuna is Global Heritage Fund’s Associate of Development. She is responsible for fundraising, coordinating events and managing relationships with GHF’s growing base of domestic and international constituents.  Katerina’s art conservation background is the primary source of her interest in GHF’s international conservation projects. She has performed diverse treatments on art and artifacts from private collections and institutions across the country including Filoli, the Frick Art Reference Library and the Guggenheim Museum.

Katerina is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Binghamton University with high honors in Art History and Fine Art. She remains captivated by historical painting techniques and the art and architecture of the Islamic world.

Santiago Giraldo, Ph. D.

DIRECTOR – LATIN AMERICA

Santiago Giraldo joined Global Heritage Fund as the Director of the Colombia Heritage Program, centering on developing a Master Management Plan for Teyuna-Ciudad Perdida Archaeological Park in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta Mountains of Colombia. He works closely with our partner institutions in Colombia such as the Instituto Colombiano de Antropología e Historia-ICANH, the Indigenous Authorities, local peasant councils, and other organizations on project development and implementation. His responsibilities also include directing site mapping and conservation assessment, as well as supporting GHF activities and projects in Peru and Guatemala.

Santiago has worked for the Instituto Colombiano de Antropología e Historia-ICANH as a research archaeologist, Coordinator for Archaeology, and Director-in-Charge of Teyuna-Ciudad Perdida Archaeological Park. During the past ten years, his work has centered on research and preservation efforts in Pueblito archaeological sites in Tayrona National Park and in Teyuna-Ciudad Perdida Archaeological Park. His investigations at Pueblito and Ciudad Perdida compared settlement and construction trajectories, finding multiple buried occupations dating to earlier time periods below the stone masonry terraces and structures on view at both sites. He is also the author of the Guidebook to Ciudad Perdida Archaeological Park.

Santiago holds an MA in Social Sciences and a PhD in Anthropology, both from the University of Chicago.

Mustafa Gönen

DIRECTOR – TURKEY

Mustafa Gönen, an urban planner, started working for Global Heritage Fund in 2004 as a consultant and currently serves as GHF’s Director of Turkish Heritage Program. Since 2004, Mustafa has worked on the Kars Ottoman District revitalization project, becoming Kars Project Director in 2006; led numerous GHF project investigations in Turkey, Kosovo, and Armenia; and has been involved with GHF’s Göbekli Tepe Project since 2012.

Mustafa has 18 years of experience in urban and regional planning, urban design, and urban management. He has an MSc. in Urban Planning from Gazi University, Ankara; an MA in Urban Design and Planning from Cergy-Pontoise University, Paris; and another MA in Urban Management from Erasmus University, Rotterdam. He continues his PhD studies on cultural heritage management and heritage economics.

Mustafa worked as a research and teaching assistant for three years in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning in Gazi University, Ankara, and worked occasionally as an assistant to the expert committee at the European University of Urban Planning and Design, Paris. He was the City Manager in Kars Municipality in 2005.

Mustafa has extensive experience in various international projects in France, Thailand, Russia, Finland, Macedonia, Benin, and Turkey. He was also the research affiliate to Harvard University’s Center for Urban Development Studies and Institute for International Urban Development for two years in Turkey. In 2007-2008 he was the representative of Urban-Challenge in Turkey, as well as the Balkans and Caucasus region. Mustafa is fluent in Turkish and English.

Nada Rafih Hosking

DIRECTOR – PROJECTS, PROGRAMS, AND PARTNERSHIPS

Nada Rafih Hosking is Global Heritage Fund’s Director of Projects, Programs and Partnerships.  In this capacity she is responsible for overseeing the management and coordination of all GHF projects and programs.  Nada also manages funding allocation, project agreements, donor reporting, and project reporting for the GHF Board of Trustees. Additionally, she oversees strategy, activities, and institutional fundraising for several key GHF projects and programs.

Nada brings a strong non-profit background to GHF’s staff, having supported the MENA Program at Global Fund for Women, one of the world’s leading women’s rights foundations, for over three years. Prior to her position at the Global Fund for Women, she was an associate manager for a private photo agency and wire service, ZUMA Press, managing its Picture Desk and providing multilingual content for the work of some of the world’s leading creative photographers.

Nada has worked and lived in multiple regions of the world.  She is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate from The University of California, Berkeley, with High Honors in both Anthropology and the History of Art.  She also studied English Literature and Linguistics at Université Hassan II in Casablanca. Nada is fluent in English, French, and Arabic (Standard and Darija).

John Hurd

SENIOR ADVISOR – CONSERVATION

John Hurd joined Global Heritage Fund in 2005 and has worked with GHF project directors and international experts on site selection, project monitoring, and especially technical direction and advice. John is also a member of the GHF Senior Advisory Board, a widely representative group of international specialists who review GHF procedures, especially site selection and annual project assessment.

Following his Bachelors of Science in the Geology of Clays, John received a two-year Conservation Science diploma and an ‘objects’ higher National diploma, leading to work as a sculpture conservator at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. From 1989 -1998, John was a partner at Lincoln Conservation Studio, a busy atelier specializing in large architectural objects conservation. In 1998, John formed Hurd Conservation International, an international field consultancy with projects across Asia for several International agencies. He was also a senior conservation consultant to UNESCO, Division of Cultural Heritage, on the Silk Roads cities of Central Asia.

John Hurd chaired the International Council on Monuments and Sites, (ICOMOS) UK Earth Scientific Committee from 1994-2000, and was elected as President of ICOMOS International Scientific Committee for Earthen Architectural Heritage in 2006. In October 2006 he was elected as President of the ICOMOS Advisory Committee. John is a fellow of the Institute of Advanced Architectural Studies and a Visiting Fellow of the school of Archaeology at the University of York. John is dedicated to education and training with cultural sensitivity and focus. He has run summer schools in India, the Trans-Himalaya region, China, and Europe.

Kuanghan Li

DIRECTOR – CHINA

Kuanghan Li joined Global Heritage Fund in 2008 and currently serves as the Director of the China Heritage Program, managing all of GHF’s conservation Projects in China. Her principal responsibilities include the collaborative conservation projects of Pingyao Ancient City in Shanxi Province, and the conservation and development of traditional villages in Guizhou Province, where she works closely with local partners including government authorities, NGOs, universities, and local research institutes, as well as the communities on planning, conservation, and community development issues.

Han has worked as a consultant to the Getty Conservation Institute’s China Principles Project, and has extensive experience with various architectural design and historic preservation projects in the US, India, France, Morocco, and China, which are affiliated with organizations such as Peking University Cultural Heritage Conservation Research Institute, Namgyal Institute of Research in Ladakhi Art and Culture, India National Trust of Art and Cultural Heritage, to name a few.

Han holds a BA in architectural studies from the National University of Singapore, a Masters degree in historic preservation and an Advanced Certificate in Architectural Conservation and Site Management from the University of Pennsylvania, and is currently a Ph. D. candidate at Peking University in cultural heritage conservation. She is fluent in Mandarin, French, and English.

Bijan Rouhani

DIRECTOR – AMAL IN HERITAGE

Dr. Bijan Rouhani, born in 1975 in Tehran, Iran, has been a conservation architect and cultural heritage consultant since 1998. His field of interest is reducing risks to cultural heritage sites, especially in times of armed conflict and natural disasters.

He is the Vice President of the Scientific Committee on Risk Preparedness (ICORP) of International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). He is also ICOMOS’ representative on the International Committee of Blue Shield’s Board, a cultural equivalent of the Red Cross, whose mission is to work for the protection of the world’s cultural heritage by co-ordinating preparations to meet and respond to emergency situations and armed conflict.

In 2010, he obtained his Ph. D. in Conservation of Architectural Heritage form La Sapienza, the University of Rome, Italy. His research was on International Principles for the Protection of Cultural Heritage during Armed Conflict. As part of his doctorate, he carried out case studies in Lebanon and Kosovo. Dr. Rouhani is or has been involved in the following activities:

  • Since the launch of the international courses of First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis in 2010 by the The International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM), Bijan has been working with ICCROM as a consultant and teacher in this programme.
  • Since 2011, he has coordinated the activities of ICOMOS’ working group for the protection of Syria’s cultural heritage during the on-going armed conflict in the country.
  • He is the coordinator of ICOMOS-ICCROM two distance-learning courses for Syrian cultural heritage professionals, which were held in 2013 in the National Museum of Damascus and then in Idlib with over 170 participants. The idea for creating an e-platform for distance learning and technical support for the heritage professionals of the MENA region germinated which eventually became the AMAL in Heritage project with Global Heritage Fund (GHF).
  • Now, in the ICOMOS’ working group, Bijan is also following the cases of Iraqi, Libyan and Yemeni cultural heritage sites.
  • Bijan is Project Specialist in Risk Management and Built Heritage in Syrian Heritage Initiative (SHI) of the American School of Oriental Research (ASOR).
  • He has worked with War Free World Heritage Listed Cities Programme, funded by the EU for the World Heritage city of Mtskheta in Georgia.
  • After the 2003 Bam earthquake, Iran, he established the Documentation Committee for the World Heritage Site of Bam Citadel within the Iranian Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization for gathering information on the destroyed citadel.
  • He has been also in charge of a number of restoration and conservation projects in Iran for historic caravanserais, houses, churches, and mosques.
  • As a cultural heritage consultant, he has worked with different national and international organisations, including UNESCO, the Italian Superior Institute for Conservation and Restoration (ISCR), and the UK-based charity Iran Heritage Foundation (IHF). Bijan also writes on cultural and natural heritage for Persian language (Farsi) media.

He lives in London with his family.

Stefaan Poortman

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO)

Stefaan Poortman joined Global Heritage Fund (GHF) in 2005 and currently serves as Chief Executive Officer. Stefaan is responsible for the management and operation of GHF in addition to the strategic direction of the organization.

In addition to being a member of GHF’s Board of Trustees, Stefaan is a member of the Board of Directors of the Tayrona Foundation for Archaeological and Environmental Research (FIAAT – Fundación de Investigaciones Arqueológicas y Ambientales Tayrona) in Colombia.

Prior to becoming CEO, Stefaan served as GHF’s Vice President of Partnerships, where he led GHF projects and fundraising in Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa in addition to managing institutional and project partnerships. Stefaan also directed GHF’s global community development program, including strategy, project activities, and fundraising.

Stefaan has over 17 years of experience with international non-profit organizations. Prior to his work with GHF, Stefaan worked at the World Resources Institute (WRI) in the Climate and Energy Program, focusing on the development of voluntary corporate greenhouse gas accounting and reporting programs in Mexico, India, the Philippines, and South Africa.

Stefaan also worked with Chemonics International to develop on-line project monitoring and evaluation tools for environmental sustainability projects, as well as with the World Foundation for Environment and Development (WFED) to broker bioprospecting agreements between conservation areas and biotech companies in the U.S. and internationally.

Stefaan holds an MA with Honors in Economics from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, with a focus on developmental and environmental economics. In addition to English, Stefaan speaks Dutch, as well as some French and Spanish.

Matthew Strebe

MANAGER – MEDIA

Matthew Strebe is Global Heritage Fund’s in-house writer and website manager. Conceptualizing, executing, and implementing the content strategy for GHF, Matthew brings his creative vision and eye for detail to open new horizons for GHF’s future development. Prior to GHF, Matthew wrote for several cultural and political publications, and also worked as a freelance copywriter for several startups. He received his BA from the University of California Santa Cruz in Philosophy and Classics.

Steven Tulsky

Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

Steven H. Tulsky, Principal of the Benemetrics Consulting Group, is an advisor to nonprofit organizations in the areas of financial management, planning, analysis, strategy, and operations. His career has encompassed over 35 years of experience as a financial professional. Prior to focusing on the nonprofit sector, he held positions as Chief Financial Officer, Director of Finance, Treasurer, and Assistant Treasurer of large, medium, and small public and private firms. Mr. Tulsky teaches Nonprofit Finance to graduate students as an Adjunct Professor at the University of San Francisco, and to attendees at various social-sector workshops. He currently serves on the boards of four community-based organizations, and his many years of nonprofit governance have included multiple terms as President and Treasurer. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Duke University, and his Masters of Business Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Board of Trustees

Global Heritage Fund’s Board of Trustees is the governing body for the organization. The Board sets the strategic direction for GHF, and oversees the financial management and business controls of the organization, including approval of the annual budget, review of audits, and approval of all major contracts and agreements with third parties.

James P. Bond

MANAGING DIRECTOR – SEQUOIA EMERGING
MARKETS FINANCE LLP

James Bond is an independent financial advisor specializing in energy and infrastructure in emerging economies. He holds several positions in this field, including non-executive director of the Latin America Infrastructure Company PLC and Senior Advisor to the French arm of Lazard Frères, an investment bank. He is also Distinguished Research Associate of the Washington-based think tank Results for Development (R4D), and of the North-South Institute, a Canadian think tank specializing in the governance of natural resources.

James has served in numerous managerial positions in the World Bank Group. Most recently, he was the Chief Operating Officer of the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) reporting to the President of the World Bank Group Mr. Robert Zoellick. MIGA provides political risk insurance and credit enhancement to investors and banks active in emerging economies. During his tenure at MIGA he oversaw the revision of the Agency’s charter documents, the introduction of a range of new products aimed at supporting sub-sovereign finance in emerging economies, and a significant streamlining of its operating procedures. Over this period MIGA’s annual volume of business grew one-third to $2.1 billion per year, and its portfolio rose 70 percent to $9.2 billion.

Prior to joining MIGA in 2008, James was World Bank Country Director for several francophone countries in West Africa. During this period, he spearheaded World Bank assistance to countries in the region, including to Côte d’Ivoire to help bring the country’s internal conflict to an end. He arranged financing for the demobilization of combatants and led a major sovereign debt workout for the country. He has also been based in Antananarivo, Madagascar, as World Bank Country Director for the Indian Ocean, where amongst other investments he arranged the financing for a major multi-modal port in the south of the country with Rio Tinto as investor.

His sectorial responsibilities at the World Bank have included those of Global Director of Energy, Mining and Telecommunications, and Director of Rural Development, Agriculture and Environment for the Africa Region. At the International Finance Corporation (IFC), also a member of the World Bank Group, James was Director of the Mining Department and was on the board of the Escondida copper development in Chile. During his tenure, IFC financed a number of important mining projects, including the privatization of the copper industry in Zambia.

Before joining the World Bank Group, James spent ten years with Total, the international oil and gas company, and also worked for Goldfields, a South African mining company. James holds a degree in chemical engineering from the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa, a graduate degree in energy economics and finance from the French engineering school ENSPM, and a doctorate in economics from the University of Panthéon-Sorbonne in Paris.

Marina Djabbarzade

HERITAGE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

A Courtauld Institute graduate, Marina’s initial career centered on collection management including: registration, conservation, organization of travelling exhibitions, and publications.  During the 1990s, she worked as a curatorial consultant for several institutions such as the Thyssen-Bornemisza Foundation, Lugano and Tibet House, New York.  She also held managerial positions for a number of cultural institutions throughout the world, advising on administrative, organizational, and operational activities.

Working increasingly with developing countries led her to further investigate their institutional needs, as well as to explore further opportunities for utilizing cultural resources as an engine for socio-economic development. She is currently consulting for the World Bank in Washington D.C., where she has developed, supervised, and evaluated Cultural Heritage projects worldwide for over a decade.  To quantify the benefits of cultural investments, she has conducted Contingent Valuation and Economic Impact Evaluation studies.  Recently she has focused on various means to increase the sustainability of investments with a particular interest in mobilizing multiple stakeholders, developing public private partnerships and engaging local communities at project sites to ensure equitable outcomes.  She is now working closely with project managers to develop new tools for monitoring and evaluating heritage projects, as well as to devise standards for an integrated approach to cultural heritage in World Bank projects across different sectors.

She has contributed to numerous World Bank papers and policy documents on issues related to cultural heritage, ranging from sustainable tourism to cultural industries development, as well as the social dimensions of culture and the integration of culture in socioeconomic development. She also drafted a background paper for the 2009 UNESCO Cultural Diversity Report.

Jennifer Emerson

Jennifer Emerson was born in Malaysia and has made her home in eight countries around Asia and Europe. She received her BA from Vanderbilt University and her MS from Columbia University in Historic Preservation. She also studied painting for a year at The Art Institute of Chicago. Ms. Emerson has built a career in advertising and healthcare, which includes founding the healthcare brokerage firm Hanover Benefits, Inc. in 1997, and working with clients such as TV Guide and investment firm Sanford Bernstein. In addition to Global Heritage Fund’s Board of Trustees, she has served on the boards of the Seattle Opera, the Henry Art Museum in Seattle, and currently the San Francisco Art Institute.

Patrick Franco

Patrick joined Foxtons as Chief Operating Officer in February 2015.  Prior to that, Patrick was COO of Credit Suisse Asset Management UK. He also helped launch the start-up, Second Home, which offers stimulating workspaces that support new forms of collaboration and creativity. He has over 11 years of financial services experience in a range of strategy and business development roles across investment banking and wealth management at Credit Suisse in London and New York. He joined Credit Suisse in 2003 after completing his BA in Modern History & Politics from Oxford University (Pembroke College).  In addition, he also holds a MBA from the University of Chicago (highest honours). Patrick is a dual US and UK citizen, and lives in London with his partner Nathan. In his spare time, he’s an avid archaeology enthusiast and explorer.  Patrick’s personal interests include international development and developing sustainable business models related to tourism that can help drive community development.  In 2013, he became a trustee of Global Heritage Fund UK.

Thomas R. Joyce

Tom Joyce lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota and spends about three months a year in London.

He joined the GHF board in 2005 and serve three terms until 2014.  During those terms, Tom was chair of the Governance Committee and later the Planning and Program Committee. Tom was reelected to the Board in 2016.

Over a long career, Tom practiced corporate law in New York, London ,Hong Kong and Minneapolis. He currently teaches corporate and securities  law at the University of Saint Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis.

Tom and his wife, Annette Atkins, have travelled extensively. He has visited many GHF sites, past and present.  He serves on other nonprofit boards, including one that works with manuscripts and brings him to current and potential GHF sites.

Tom studied philosophy at Saint john’s University in Minnesota and law at the Notre Dame Law School.

J. Alec Merriam

PRESIDENT – JAGUAR PROPERTIES CORP.
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT – CROWLEY MARITIME CORP. (RETIRED)

Alec Merriam is currently the president and owner of Jaguar Properties Corp., which owns commercial real estate properties in Texas and owns and operates a wine warehouse and logistics business in Sonoma, California. Previously, he was Executive Vice President and CFO of Crowley Maritime Corp., a San Francisco-based international shipping and logistics business. Before moving to the Bay Area in 1972, he was Assistant Controller of Northern Natural Gas Co. in Omaha. He was educated at Princeton University and the Harvard Business School. He is a Trustee of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, where he has served on the Building Committee for the new de Young Museum, the Executive Committee, and as Chairman of the Acquisition Committee. He also served on the board of the St. Francis Hospital Foundation as Chairman and The Fort Mason Foundation as Vice Chairman. For 40 years, Alec and his wife Gail have had a keen interest in the Maya civilization, traveling to Mexico and Guatemala many times, attending archaeological symposiums, building a library of books on the Maya, and collecting Maya art. They have also traveled to many other archaeological sites throughout the world such as Machu Picchu, Petra, Ephesus, and Angkor Wat, and visited Global Heritage Fund’s sites in Cyrene, Libya, and Mirador, Guatemala.

Joy Ou

FOUNDER – GROUP I

As Founder, President and Chief Executive Officer of Group I, Joy Ou directs the growth and vision of the company’s real estate development, design and marketing activities.

With over thirty years of real estate experience in San Francisco, Ms. Ou provides the strategic insight required in today’s elevated and competitive market. Joy also has an extensive background as an artist, designer and community activist. As a result Ms. Ou’s projects are distinguished by their commitment to merge social responsibility with quality construction and unique style.

Ms. Ou’s work has been featured in Architectural Magazine, San Francisco Focus and San Francisco Magazine. She has been honored with several national design awards for her contributions to the San Francisco urban landscape

Ms. Ou is also extensively involved in philanthropy and volunteer activities, both locally and abroad, serving on the board of directors of the San Francisco Art Institute and the non-profit Wildflowers Institute. In addition, she serves as an advisor to several non-profits including, locally the Luggage Store Gallery and internationally, the Global Heritage Fund.

Ms. Ou actively supports San Francisco’s Chinatown Community Development Center and several Tenderloin youth organizations. She serves as Executive Director of the Ou Jong Fa Foundation in Taiwan and is a past Trustee for the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Ms. Ou holds a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California.

Stefaan Poortman

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Stefaan Poortman joined Global Heritage Fund (GHF) in 2005 and currently serves as Executive Director. Stefaan is responsible for the management and operation of GHF in addition to the strategic direction of the organization.

In addition to being a member of GHF’s Board of Trustees, Stefaan is a member of the Board of Directors of the Tayrona Foundation for Archaeological and Environmental Research (FIAAT – Fundación de Investigaciones Arqueológicas y Ambientales Tayrona) in Colombia.

Prior to becoming Executive Director, Stefaan served as GHF’s Vice President of Partnerships, where he led GHF projects and fundraising in Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa in addition to managing institutional and project partnerships. Stefaan also directed GHF’s global community development program, including strategy, project activities, and fundraising.

Stefaan has over 17 years of experience with international non-profit organizations. Prior to his work with GHF, Stefaan worked at the World Resources Institute (WRI) in the Climate and Energy Program, focusing on the development of voluntary corporate greenhouse gas accounting and reporting programs in Mexico, India, the Philippines, and South Africa.

Stefaan also worked with Chemonics International to develop on-line project monitoring and evaluation tools for environmental sustainability projects, as well as with the World Foundation for Environment and Development (WFED) to broker bioprospecting agreements between conservation areas and biotech companies in the U.S. and internationally.

Stefaan holds an MA with Honors in Economics from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, with a focus on developmental and environmental economics. In addition to English, Stefaan speaks Dutch, as well as some French and Spanish.

Lisa Sardegna

OWNER – EURYALE CONSERVATION

Lisa Sardegna is an architectural conservator who specializes in the analysis and conservation of historic finishes. After interning for two years in the paintings conservation department at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Lisa earned an M.S. in Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania. During her studies, she participated in overseas projects in Puerto Rico and Rome, ultimately continuing work in Rome to investigate historic plaster finishes in the Orto Botanico.

A love of ancient architecture, diverse cultures, and languages has driven Lisa to work on projects where she can explore the world and make a positive impact. She is involved in conservation projects and development at the local, national, and world levels. In San Francisco, Lisa serves as a trustee of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, as well as on several committees including Acquisitions and Development. She provides principal support for the Paintings Conservation department, and regularly volunteers with the conservation team there on a project basis. Lisa serves on the Board of Overseers for the University of Pennsylvania School of Design, where she provides support for advanced training of recent graduates. She is actively working to create new training opportunities for young people through exchanges with other international universities. At the international level, Lisa works on varied projects in diverse locations, from cleaning frescoes in Roman churches to digging at an active archaeological site in Greece. She has volunteered at sites supported by Global Heritage Fund in Guatemala and Turkey, providing conservation expertise and training for local workers.

Through these professional and charitable activities, Lisa works to preserve for future generations the cultural heritage that enriches communities at home and around the world. To that end, she is particularly focused on supporting conservation education to ensure that local communities have the tools to preserve their heritage. Lisa lives in San Francisco and Rome with her husband, David A. Carrillo.

Paul Slawson

CHAIRMAN – GENERAL ATLANTIC GROUP (RETIRED)

Mr. Slawson has had an international career in both the public and private sector.

Before his recent retirement, he was Chairman of the General Atlantic Group, an investment company headquartered in London and active in Europe, Asia, and North America. Prior to that he was president of the Getz Corporation, a major international trading company, and held senior executive positions with ITT and the Bendix Corporations.

His public service includes duty as a submarine officer, starting the Peace Corps in several Asian and African countries, Chair of the American University of Paris, and President of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco.

Mr. Slawson is a member of the Council of Foreign Relations, a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and serves on the Boards of the Asia Foundation and The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

He holds diplomas from the U.S. Naval Academy, The Fletcher School, Harvard University, and the School of African and Asian Studies (Univ. of London).

George Sycip

PRESIDENT – HALANNA MANAGEMENT CORPORATION

George Sycip is President of Halanna Management Corporation and a founder and principal in Galaxaco China Group LLC. Mr Sycip advises a variety of companies in their cross-border endeavours between the US, Europe, and Asia. He also sits on several corporate boards, including Agritech Group Holdings International Pte Ltd, which develops biofuels in West Africa; Alliance Select Foods International, Inc, which has operations in the Philippines, Indonesia, and New Zealand and exports to 40 countries; Bank of the Orient in San Francisco; Beneficial Life Insurance Company in the Philippines; MacroAsia Corporation, a provider of airport and aircraft, including inflight catering and the heavy overhaul & maintenance of Airbus 320, 330 and 340 aircraft; Medtecs International Corporation Limited, which has textile and garment manufacturing operations in Cambodia, China, and the Philippines; and Paxys, Inc, a business process outsourcing firm with operations in the Philippines and Australia .

Prior to setting up his own offices, Mr Sycip had a career in banking and currently serves on the Boards of the International Institute for Rural Reconstruction, Give2Asia, and the California Asia Business Council. He also served as Commissioner for the City and County of San Francisco’s Social Services Department in the 1980s and was on the Advisory Board of Stanford University’s Institute for International Studies for over 15 years. Mr Sycip was born in the Philippines and received his A.B. in International Relations/Economics from Stanford University and his M.B.A. from Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration.

Daniel K. Thorne

PRESIDENT – STAR LAKE CAPITAL, INC.

Dan Thorne is President of Star Lake Capital, Inc., a private equity management and venture capital firm. Mr. Thorne is also Chairman of the eponymous Daniel K. Thorne Foundation, supporting historic preservation and wildlife conservation worldwide. An ardent preservationist and conservationist, he is a Trustee Emeritus of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and serves on the board of the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International.  He is a former member of the board of the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Since 1995, he has also been a principal shareholder and member of the Board of Directors of Hamilton Thorne Biosciences, Inc. Mr. Thorne has in the past served on the boards of CCH, Inc. from 1979-1996, SLT Communications, and the Imperial Sugar Company, as well as serving as Chairman of the Georgetown Steel Company, subsequently sold to the Mittal Steel Group.

Tony Wheeler

CO-FOUNDER – LONELY PLANET

Tony Wheeler was born in England in 1946, but spent most of his younger years overseas. Those years included a lengthy spell in Pakistan, a shorter period in the West Indies, and all of his high school years in the USA. He returned to England to do an engineering degree, worked for a short time as an automotive engineer, then went back to university and completed an MBA.

As soon as Tony left business school in London in 1972, he and his wife Maureen set off for an overland trip to Asia. Their intention was to be away for about a year, get travel out of their systems and then settle down. When they arrived in Australia with 27 cents and a camera (which they soon pawned) between them, the continual questioning from people they met – How did you travel? What did you see? What did it cost? – inspired them to turn their diaries into a book. They called it Across Asia on the Cheap.

The first print run was 1500 copies, hand collated, hand trimmed, and hand stapled. Tony and Maureen took the book around to bookshops in Sydney and it sold out in the first week. Eighteen months in Southeast Asia resulted in their second guide, South-East Asia on a Shoestring, which they put together in a backstreet Chinese hotel in Singapore in 1975. The ‘yellow bible,’ as it became known because of its distinctive yellow cover, soon became the guide to the region. It has sold well over a million copies worldwide and is now in its 16th edition, still retaining its familiar yellow cover.

From those early guidebooks, Lonely Planet Publications has grown to become the world’s largest independent guidebook publisher with more than 500 titles in print, over 400 staff, and offices in London and Oakland as well as the head office in Melbourne. Tony and Maureen have now sold the business to BBC-Worldwide, but Tony is still involved with the company and continues to travel widely. The Planet Wheeler Foundation concentrates on health and educational projects principally in Southeast Asia and East Africa.

Patrick Whitney

DIRECTOR – THE INSTITUTE OF DESIGN,
ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Professor Patrick Whitney is the director of the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology, and is the Steelcase/Robert C. Pew Professor of Design.

Whitney has published and lectured throughout the world about how to make technological innovations more humane, the link between design and business strategy, and methods of designing interactive communications and products.

His writing has focused on new frameworks of design that respond to two transformations: the shift from mass-production to flexible production, and the shift from national markets to markets that are both global and “markets of one.”

He is on the Distinguished Advisory Board of the Association of Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group in Computer Human Interaction (ACM-SIGCHI). He has been on the jury of numerous award programs, including the 1995 Presidential Design Awards, and was a member of the White House Council on Design. Whitney was chairman of the program of the 1978 US Conference of the International Council on Graphic Design Associations (ICOGRADA), which was the first major meeting addressing the issues of evaluating design from the perspective of users. Professor Whitney was the President of the American Center for Design (ACD) and the editor of the Design Journal, its annual publication. He edited Design in the Information Environment, a book published by Knopf in 1984.

He has consulted to numerous corporations, including Aetna, Texas Instruments, McDonald’s, and Zebra Technologies, and has conducted private education programs for executives from government agencies and corporations in the USA, Europe, and Asia.

Recent speaking engagements include the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit, and the TED Conference 2004 in Monterey. He is the principal investigator of a research project called Global Companies in Local Markets, and of the Institute of Design’s Design for the Base of the Pyramid sustainable development initiative.

Honorary Leadership Board

The GHF Honorary Leadership Board is comprised of distinguished and dedicated civic and business leaders who provide invaluable strategic advice, guidance and support for GHF’s organizational advancement.

Regina and Gerhard Casper

Gerhard Casper is President Emeritus of Stanford University and the Peter and Helen Bing Professor in Undergraduate Education at Stanford. He is also a Professor of Law, a Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford (FSI), and a Professor of Political Science (by courtesy).

Mr. Casper studied law at the universities of Freiburg and Hamburg, where he earned his first law degree in 1961. He attended Yale Law School, obtaining his Master of Laws degree in 1962. He then returned to Freiburg, where he received his doctorate in 1964. In the fall of 1964, Mr. Casper emigrated to the United States, spending two years as Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley. In 1966, he joined the faculty of the University of Chicago Law School, and between 1979 and 1987 served as Dean of the Law School. In 1989, Mr. Casper was appointed Provost of the University of Chicago. He served as President of Stanford University from 1992-2000.

Mr. Casper has written and taught primarily in the fields of constitutional law, constitutional history, comparative law, and jurisprudence. From 1977 to 1991, he was an editor of The Supreme Court Review. His books include a monograph on legal realism (Berlin, 1967), an empirical study of the Supreme Court’s workload (Chicago, 1976, with Richard A. Posner), an empirical study of lay judges in criminal trials (Heidelberg, 1979, with Hans Zeisel), as well as Separating Power (Cambridge, MA, 1997) concerning the separation of powers practices at the end of the 18th century in the United States.

Phyllis and William Draper III

Having begun his venture capital career in 1959, William H. Draper III is one of America’s first venture capitalists. Today, he is Managing Director of Draper Richards L.P and Draper International, and Chairman of The Draper Richards Foundation. Draper served as the head of the United Nations Development Program from 1986 to 1993, and oversaw nearly 10,000 international aid projects.  He was also President and Chairman of the Export-Import Bank of the United States from 1981 to 1986, a position Ronald Reagan appointed him to. He also founded Sutter Hill Ventures, one of the leading venture capital firms in the U.S., in 1965.

He is on the boards of the Atlantic Council, The Draper Richards Foundation, Hoover Institution, Freeman Spogli Institute of International Studies at Stanford University, World Affairs Council of Northern California, the United Nations Association-USA, and the Harvard Business School California Research Center Advisory Board.  He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the President’s Council on International Activities at Yale University. Draper formerly served as the Chairman of the World Affairs Council of Northern California, Chairman of the Institute of International Education, as a Trustee of Yale University, and as Chairman of the Board of the American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco; he was a former Board member of Population Action International, George Bush Library Foundation, the Advisory Council of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and the World Rehabilitation Fund in New York.

Draper received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale University in 1950 and a Master of Business degree, with distinction, from the Harvard Business School in 1954.

Thomas Joyce - Chair

CHAIR OF CORPORATE FINANCE – DORSEY & WHITNEY LLP

Tom is a partner in the Minneapolis and London offices and Chair of the Corporate Finance practice group. Before becoming a partner in the firm, Tom was a partner in a leading London-based law firm and was co-head of its securities practice. Before that he was a partner in a leading New York-based law firm for 20 years.

Tom has decades of experience in corporate finance and securities around the world in the leading financial markets of New York, Hong Kong, and London. His experience includes capital market transactions, cross border mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, and project finance. Tom was heavily involved in U.S. equity offerings connected with UK and Italian privatizations. His sector experience includes telecoms, oil and gas, and electric utilities.

Judy Koch

Judy Koch is the founder of Bring Me A Book and was President, CEO, and Board Chair of RSP Manufacturing Corporation from 1990 to 1997. RSP provided electro-mechanical contract manufacturing services to companies in Silicon Valley. Bring Me A Book grew out of a benefit program she had provided to employees of her company. Judy began her career as an English teacher in California public schools. In 2004, she co-founded Fortune8Ventures LLC, a global business development company with offices in Shanghai and San Francisco. She is a member of The Committee of 200, Women’s Forum West, University Rotary Club of Palo Alto, and a Senior Fellow of the American Leadership Forum. Judy received the Philanthropic Innovator Award in 2004 from the Committee of 200 and the 2003 Early Intervention for School Success Educator of the Year Award.

Cecilia and David Lee

David S. Lee is Chairman of the Board for eOn Communications Corporation, Cortelco, Spark Technology Corporation, and the Symbio Group. Mr. Lee was a member of the President’s Council on the 21st Century Workforce, appointed by President George Bush Jr., and Mr. Lee is Regent Emeritus for the University of California. Mr. Lee also serves as Senior Advisor to Silver Lake Partners.

Born in China, Mr. Lee holds an Honorary Doctorate of Engineering and B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Montana State University and an M.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from North Dakota State University.

Cecilia C. M. Lee served as former Chairman of Asian Cultural Teachings, Founder and Honorary Chairman of the Crystal Children’s Choir, and West Valley Community College District of Advancement Foundations. She is also a former Board Director of KQED (a Bay area PBS station) and of the Asian Art Commissioner for the City of San Francisco. Cecilia was also a member of the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, appointed by President George Bush Jr. Additionally, Cecilia served as an Advisor to the Department of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco.

Cecilia was born in China to a prominent Northern Chinese family. She received a bachelor’s degree from the National Music and Art Institute in Taiwan. Cecilia married David Lee, a successful Silicon Valley leader, who is the Chairman for eOn Communications, Spark Technology, and Cortelco. During the earlier years of their marriage, Cecilia not only dedicated her time to raising a family but also helped her husband in the establishment of many of his businesses as a “Silent Partner.” Her knowledge is not limited only to business; since 1985, she has been actively involved in real estate development and property management. Cecilia has always been very active in community affairs, such as the Stanford Children’s Hospital, the establishment of a high school scholarship in China, and numerous other charities. Cecilia was also a former Board member of the Tech Museum of Innovation, located in San Jose, California.

Cecilia maintains homes in both Los Altos Hills and Hawaii. She is a native of northern China and is a naturalized U.S. citizen. Mrs. Lee is fluent in English and Mandarin Chinese. She is the proud mother of three children and now happily spends her time being a grandmother of three. She is a welcome member of the Chinese and U.S. community respectively.

Deedee and Burt McMurtry

Burt and Deedee McMurtry graduated from Rice University in 1956 and moved to the Bay Area in 1957 after Burt’s fifth year at Rice. Burt joined Sylvania in its Microwave Tube Division and began part-time graduate work at Stanford University. He received an MSEE degree in 1959 and a PhD in 1962. He continued to work for Sylvania (which became GTE) until 1969, when he joined Jack Melchor in starting a venture capital business. He was involved full time in the venture capital business until 1995. He was also a founder of VC partnerships Institutional Venture Associates (IVA) and Technology Venture Investors (TVI).  Portfolio companies included Adaptec, Altera, Compaq, Intuit, KLA-Tencor, Linear Technology Corporation, Microsoft, NBI, Nellcor, PMC Sierra, Quantum, ROLM Corporation, SpectraLink, Sun Microsystems, Synopsys, Triad Systems Corporation, VeriFone, and Visio.

Deedee McMurtry is an active volunteer, a trustee of the American Conservatory Theater (ACT) in San Francisco, and is involved with arts advisory committees at Stanford.

Burt served seventeen years on the Rice University board, eleven years on the Stanford University board (the last four as chairman, ending July 1, 2008,) and seven years on the board of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. They have two children and four grandchildren.

Athelia and Kenneth M. Woolley

Mr. Woolley is the Chief Executive Officer of Extra Space Storage and has been a director of several technology companies including: Megahertz Holding Corporation, Vystar Group, Inc., and Cirque Corporation. An esteemed business professional, Mr. Woolley also serves as an adjunct professor of business management at Brigham Young University, and holds a B.A. in Physics from Brigham Young University, and an M.B.A. and a Ph.D. in Business Administration from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business.

Senior Advisory Board

The Senior Advisory Board is comprised of leaders in the field of archaeological conservation, tourism and community development, project funding and other expertise for the safeguarding of World and National heritage sites.

The Senior Advisory Board meets at least twice each year primarily through international teleconferencing, with the option of committee meetings scheduled on an ad-hoc basis for Site Selection, Strategy and Quality Assessment.

Senior Advisory Board members support GHF world heritage conservation work through their ideas, contacts, experience and recommendations.

Primary areas of Senior Advisory Board collaboration are the review of:
• GHF site Selection and nominations
• Site Conservation Strategy
• Master Conservation Planning
• Scientific Conservation
• Quality Assessment and Progress Reviews
• Community Development and Responsible Tourism

Graham Brooks

MANAGING DIRECTOR – THE HERITAGE CONSULTANCY
CHAIRMAN EMERITUS – AUSHERITAGE LTD.

Graham is a conservation architect and heritage consultant based in Sydney, Australia, where he is Managing Director of a private sector Heritage Consultancy firm.  Much of his career has centred on the conservation and heritage management of historic buildings, urban areas and cultural landscapes throughout Australia.  Graham is a former Chairman of the National Trust Historic Buildings Committee in New South Wales and Chairman Emeritus of AusHeritage Ltd, a cross sectoral heritage network established in the mid 1990s with the support of the Australian Government.

Graham’s work in cultural tourism has included extensive investigations into the relationship between tourism and heritage places throughout Europe, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. His interest and expertise in cultural tourism management is based on extensive travels and research since the mid 1970s, including to over 300 World Heritage Sites, and participation in numerous international projects and workshops.  Graham is the current President of the ICOMOS International Cultural Tourism Committee, and was the coordinating author for the ICOMOS International Cultural Tourism Charter (1999) and the UNWTO Tourism Congestion Management at Cultural and Heritage Sites: A Guidebook (2005).  He represented ICOMOS on the World Heritage Sustainable Tourism Initiative program developed by the UNESCO World Heritage Centre.  He has been a member of international expert advisory panels for Borobudur and Prambanan Temple Compounds in Indonesia and the Ajanta/Ellora Rock Cut Temple Caves in India, and contributed to the development of the Lijiang Principles project initiated by UNESCO Bangkok to promote the capture, by host communities, of socio-economic benefits from tourism.  A current project, again on behalf of the UN World Tourism Organisation, is the development of a new handbook for the tourism sector on Communicating Heritage.

Marina Djabbarzade - Chair

HERITAGE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

A Courtauld Institute graduate, Marina’s initial career centered on collection management including: registration, conservation, organization of travelling exhibitions, and publications.  During the 1990s, she worked as a curatorial consultant for several institutions such as the Thyssen-Bornemisza Foundation, Lugano and Tibet House, New York.  She also held managerial positions for a number of cultural institutions throughout the world, advising on administrative, organizational, and operational activities.

Working increasingly with developing countries led her to further investigate their institutional needs, as well as to explore further opportunities for utilizing cultural resources as an engine for socio-economic development. She is currently consulting for the World Bank in Washington D.C., where she has developed, supervised, and evaluated Cultural Heritage projects worldwide for over a decade.  To quantify the benefits of cultural investments, she has conducted Contingent Valuation and Economic Impact Evaluation studies.  Recently she has focused on various means to increase the sustainability of investments with a particular interest in mobilizing multiple stakeholders, developing public private partnerships and engaging local communities at project sites to ensure equitable outcomes.  She is now working closely with project managers to develop new tools for monitoring and evaluating heritage projects, as well as to devise standards for an integrated approach to cultural heritage in World Bank projects across different sectors.

She has contributed to numerous World Bank papers and policy documents on issues related to cultural heritage, ranging from sustainable tourism to cultural industries development, as well as the social dimensions of culture and the integration of culture in socioeconomic development. She also drafted a background paper for the 2009 UNESCO Cultural Diversity Report.

Andy Drumm

Andy is a sustainable tourism specialist with over 20 years of experience developing and implementing strategies to maximize tourism’s contribution to the conservation of nature and indigenous culture around the world, particularly in Latin America and the Caribbean.

He lived in Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands for 11 years before moving to Washington DC in 1998 to work as Senior Ecotourism Specialist for The Nature Conservancy (TNC). He created and ran an award-winning ecotourism business in Ecuador for many years, and has developed strategies to improve tourism management and the financial sustainability of protected area systems. He created The Acción Amazonia and Conservation in Action Foundations to support his collaborations with the indigenous communities of the Amazon in defense of their cultural and territorial integrity. This work led in 2010 to the creation of a 100,000 acre Huaorani rainforest conservation area at the headwaters of the Amazon.

He represented TNC on the World Heritage Sustainable Tourism Initiative program developed by the UNESCO World Heritage Centre. He has ample experience in providing technical assistance and capacity building to local and national governments, national park systems, tourism businesses, and NGOs. He is also skilled in developing technical capacities in many aspects of sustainable tourism management and development, including community based tourism initiatives, impact management, financial sustainability, and business planning. Andy has worked in a variety of roles in documentary and film productions in the Amazon and Galapagos, highlighting environmental issues.

Andy has produced many studies, articles, and publications on ecotourism and sustainable tourism, including manuals which have been translated into several languages. His most recent, titled Threshold of Sustainability for Tourism in Protected Areas, has been published by TNC, USAID, US Forest Service, and the Convention on Biodiversity.

Andy is fluent in Spanish and French, and is an experienced Scuba Divemaster. He is a charter member and former Advisory Board member of the International Ecotourism Society, and has been a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society since 1990.

Larry Hannah

LEAD ECONOMIST – THE WORLD BANK (RETIRED)

Larry Hannah has 35 years of experience in international development spanning multiple countries in every region of the world. He has had responsibility for the study of a wide range of development problems, and has designed solutions and prepared and managed the implementation of projects. As an economist, Mr. Hannah has been the analyst and the author of numerous reports and publications, and makes presentations regularly on these topics.

Substantively, Mr. Hannah has worked on problems related to the economic prospects of developing nations. His main focus has been on urban development, where he specialized in housing policy and housing finance, slum upgrading, urban land markets, regulatory economics, municipal finance, sub-national fiscal policy, and cultural heritage. He has a special interest in finance and credit market development, both for housing and local government.

Mr. Hannah was formerly Lead Economist for the World Bank. During his 28 years as an economist there, he held a series of positions that engaged him in country-level economic work as well as policy advice and projects on urban development issues around the globe. Previously, Mr. Hannah was Senior Programme Officer for the International Development Research Centre (IDRC-Canada) where he was responsible for development and appraisal of research projects on economics throughout the developing world. Mr. Hannah has also held the positions of Visiting Scholar or Fellow at the Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (Dacca) and the Korea Development Institute (Seoul).

James Hooper

James Hooper founded the UK office of the Global Heritage Fund in 2007 and continues to serve as a UK Trustee. He is a qualified solicitor with experience in both transactional and contentious property and construction law. He is a member of the ICOMOS committee on legal, administrative and financial matters and a Trustee of the Prince’s School of Traditional Arts.

John Hurd

SENIOR ADVISOR – CONSERVATION

John Hurd joined Global Heritage Fund in 2005 and has worked with GHF project directors and international experts on site selection, project monitoring, and especially technical direction and advice. John is also a member of the GHF Senior Advisory Board, a widely representative group of international specialists who review GHF procedures, especially site selection and annual project assessment.

Following his Bachelors of Science in the Geology of Clays, John received a two-year Conservation Science diploma and an ‘objects’ higher National diploma, leading to work as a sculpture conservator at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. From 1989 -1998, John was a partner at Lincoln Conservation Studio, a busy atelier specializing in large architectural objects conservation. In 1998, John formed Hurd Conservation International, an international field consultancy with projects across Asia for several International agencies. He was also a senior conservation consultant to UNESCO, Division of Cultural Heritage, on the Silk Roads cities of Central Asia.

John Hurd chaired the International Council on Monuments and Sites, (ICOMOS) UK Earth Scientific Committee from 1994-2000, and was elected as President of ICOMOS International Scientific Committee for Earthen Architectural Heritage in 2006. In October 2006 he was elected as President of the ICOMOS Advisory Committee. John is a fellow of the Institute of Advanced Architectural Studies and a Visiting Fellow of the school of Archaeology at the University of York. John is dedicated to education and training with cultural sensitivity and focus. He has run summer schools in India, the Trans-Himalaya region, China, and Europe.

Anthea M. Hartig, Ph. D.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR – CALIFORNIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Anthea M. Hartig came to the California Historical Society after six years with the National Trust for Historic Preservation, where she directed the Trust’s Western Office and served the six continental far western states along with Hawai’i, Alaska, and the Pacific Island Territories of Guam and Micronesia. Previously Dr. Hartig taught history and cultural studies at La Sierra University in Riverside and graduate courses in historic preservation at the University of California, Riverside from where she holds a Ph. D. and Master’s Degree.

Dr. Hartig’s interest in the relevance of California’s stories and places has come to define her professional and advocational life. She served as a municipal preservation planner for over a decade, and owned a cultural resources consulting firm. She has served on many local, statewide, and national history-related non-profit foundations’ boards of directors, including the California Preservation Foundation and the California Council for the Promotion of History, and has published in both academic and professional journals. Under Governor Gray Davis, she served as Chairperson of the State Historical Resources Commission.

In 2011, Dr. Hartig was named California Preservationist of the Year at the 36th annual California Preservation Conference and in 2012 the California Heritage Council presented her its Award for Distinguished Service to the Heritage and History of the State of California. These awards were presented in recognition of Hartig’s outstanding contributions, exceptional leadership, and more than 25 years of service in the field of historic preservation in California.

Anthea lives with her husband, two boys, and their rescue puppy in San Mateo.

Pamela Jerome

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR – COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
DIRECTOR OF PRESERVATION – WASA

Pamela Jerome, AIA, is a registered architect and architectural conservator. She holds a BArch in architectural engineering from the National Technical University in Athens, Greece (1980) and an MSc in historic preservation from Columbia University (1991). She is currently Partner-in-Charge of Preservation with WASA/Studio A, a New York City-based architecture and engineering firm.

She is also an Adjunct Associate Professor at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. She sits on the Board of Trustees of US/ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites) and is that organization’s liaison to the APT (Association for Preservation Technology International) board.

Ms. Jerome is vice president of ICOMOS’s International Scientific Committee on Earthen Architectural Heritage (ISCEAH) and an elected coordinator of ICOMOS’s Scientific Council. Her expertise is in masonry conservation and waterproofing, with a particular emphasis on earthen architecture and archaeological site preservation. She has consulted on cultural property conservation in the US, Mediterranean, Black Sea, Middle East, and South America.

Jolyon Leslie

CONSULTANT – URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND HERITAGE

Born in South Africa, Jolyon studied at Cambridge University, where he became interested in the overlap between architecture and development, and particularly the role of informal urban settlements. This led to field research in Botswana, where he embarked on a professional architectural practice. He has subsequently managed a range of field programs aimed at addressing reconstruction needs after natural disasters, post-conflict resettlement, urban recovery/development, and heritage conservation in the Middle East and central Asia for NGOs and the United Nations. Based in Kabul, Afghanistan he currently works as an independent consultant.

Jolyon cut his heritage teeth in rural Yemen, where for several years he managed an initiative promoting traditional building techniques in an earthquake-affected area. Following an assignment to Afghanistan to assess shelter needs, he went on to manage for UNHabitat, a national resettlement program that evolved into an urban recovery initiative in 1994. After a year in the northern areas of Pakistan establishing a built environment program for the Aga Khan Development Network, Jolyon returned to Kabul to serve as UN regional Coordinator between 1996 and 2000, during the Taliban administration. In 2001, he contributed to a joint UN/World Bank/ADB Needs Assessment for Afghanistan and in 2003 undertook an assessment of UNAMA, as part of a comparative case-study of UN peace operations. Between 2004 and 2010 he managed the program of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture in Afghanistan, which included rehabilitation of the Mughal garden of Baghe Babur, conservation of the mausoleum of Timur Shah, and an extensive program of conservation and rehabilitation in the old city of Kabul. From 2005, he oversaw an urban conservation program in the old city of Herat, culminating in the restoration of the historic citadel of ala Ikhtyaruddin. During 2011, he advised the Ministry of Urban Development on urban conservation and development issues, as part of a World Bank-funded initiative.

Jolyon has written extensively about the political transition in Afghanistan and its cultural heritage. Among his publications are: Afghanistan: The Mirage of Peace (Zed Press, London, 2004 with Chris “Culture and Contest” in The Future of Afghanistan (USIP 2009); and “Urban Recovery: The case of Historic Kabul” with Abdul Wasay Najimi in Heritage and Sustainability in the Islamic Built Environment (ed. Bashir Kazimee, WIT Press 2011). He is currently researching a book about Kabul.

Jolyon is a founder-member of the Society for the Preservation of Afghanistan’s Cultural Heritage (SPACH), a member of the National Museum Advisory Committee, founder and advisor to the Afghan Cultural Heritage Consulting Organization (ACHCO), member of the Board of the Afghan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU), and chair of the Board of Afghan Education Production Organization (AEPO).

Vincent L. Michael, Ph. D.

SENIOR DIRECTOR – GLOBAL HERITAGE FUND

Vincent L. Michael, Ph.D. began working with GHF in 2008, visiting the Pingyao project in China as a member of the Senior Advisory Board (SAB), and then completing a mid-term assessment of the site in 2011.  He then became Chair of the SAB in 2011 and joined GHF as Chief Conservation Officer in 2012, before being elected Executive Director.

Vince held the John H. Bryan Chair in Historic Preservation at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he was Director of the Historic Preservation program from 1996 to 2010.  Vince is a Trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the nation’s premier private preservation organization, where he served as Vice Chair of the Preservation and Sites Committee and Vice Chair of the Diversity Task Force.

A professional preservationist since 1983, Vincent worked on the creation and interpretation of the Illinois & Michigan Canal National Heritage Corridor, the nation’s first heritage area.  He was a planner and advocate for Landmarks Illinois for eight years, and has served on their Board for the last decade.  He received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Chicago, and received a Trustee’s Award from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to complete his doctorate in architectural history at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

He is Chair Emeritus of the National Council for Preservation Education and of the Site Council for the Gaylord Building, a National Trust property. He also served on the Illinois Historic Sites Advisory Council and Oak Park Historic Preservation Commission.  He began his international work in 1997 and brought graduate students to work on heritage sites in Ireland, China, and Peru eight times between 1998 and 2012.  He also represented the United States in preservation education conferences in the Ukraine and Sweden in 2006 and 2007.

Since 2003 he has worked to preserve the Weishan Heritage Valley in Yunnan, China, with the Center for US-China Arts Exchange at Columbia University and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, frequently bringing student study groups to the Southern Silk Road city.  He has also been involved in the preservation of the Cercado World Heritage Site in Lima, Peru.  Vince has lectured on heritage conservation, architecture, geography, art, and history throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia.  His writings include the books The Architecture of Barry Byrne and Chinese Old City Weishan, as well as articles in Design Issues, Future Anterior, Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Traditional Building, and forum journal.  Vincent’s blog, Time Tells, has been cited as noteworthy by traditional media.

Webber Ndoro, Ph. D.

AFRICAN WORLD HERITAGE FUND (AWHF)

Currently, Webber Ndoro is the Director of the African World Heritage Fund, which is based in Johannesburg, South Africa. He is also an Associate Research Fellow at the University of Cape Town. He has worked on many heritage projects in Africa since the 1990s.

He used to be a Project Manager at ICCROM in Rome, Italy for the Africa 2009 program from 2000-2007. Previously, he taught Heritage Management at both undergraduate and graduate levels at the University of Zimbabwe and the University of Bergen, Norway. He previously worked for National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe as the National Coordinator for the Conservation of National Monuments. He spent a number of years working at the Great Zimbabwe World Heritage site.

Christian G. Ost, Ph. D.

Christian G. Ost is an economist with extensive experience in education institution management, business cycle theory, and economics of heritage. He holds a Ph. D. in Economics from the Catholic University of Louvain, a Master’s degree in Economics from Georgetown University, and a Certificate in European Studies from the University of Geneva. He is Professor at ICHEC Brussels Management School, Université Catholique de Louvain, and at the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation at the Université Catholique de Louvain. He was Dean of the ICHEC Brussels Management School from 2000 to 2008, and is currently in charge of the executive education programs.

During the 1980s, Christian was a business cycle analyst at ITT Brussels-based European headquarters, and at the IRES business cycle research center at the Université Catholique de Louvain. He also co-founded the Thomas Clemson University Brussels Center, which enabled more than 500 student exchanges between Belgium and South Carolina from 2006 to 2012.

He has been developing the field of economics applied to cultural heritage since the 1980s. He was co-author with Raymond Lemaire (co-founder of ICOMOS) of the 1984 report to the European Commission European Cultural Built Heritage: Economic Analysis and Policies. He has been a visiting lecturer at ICCROM in Rome, Université Robert Schuman in Strasbourg, Universita Federico II in Naples, IHEC-Tunis, EAFIT in Medellin, University of Calgary, IESEG in Lille, and Claremont College in Los Angeles. He is member of the ICOMOS International Economics Committee, which he chaired from 2000 to 2005. In 2008-09, he was guest scholar in residence at the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles. The final report of the research was entitled A Guide for Heritage Economics in Historic Cities: Values, Indicators, Maps and Policies.

Stefaan Poortman

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR – GLOBAL HERITAGE FUND

Stefaan Poortman joined Global Heritage Fund (GHF) in 2005 and currently serves as Executive Director. Stefaan is responsible for the management and operation of GHF in addition to the strategic direction of the organization.

In addition to being a member of GHF’s Board of Trustees, Stefaan is a member of the Board of Directors of the Tayrona Foundation for Archaeological and Environmental Research (FIAAT – Fundación de Investigaciones Arqueológicas y Ambientales Tayrona) in Colombia.

Prior to becoming Executive Director, Stefaan served as GHF’s Vice President of Partnerships, where he led GHF projects and fundraising in Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa in addition to managing institutional and project partnerships. Stefaan also directed GHF’s global community development program, including strategy, project activities, and fundraising.

Stefaan has over 17 years of experience with international non-profit organizations. Prior to his work with GHF, Stefaan worked at the World Resources Institute (WRI) in the Climate and Energy Program, focusing on the development of voluntary corporate greenhouse gas accounting and reporting programs in Mexico, India, the Philippines, and South Africa.

Stefaan also worked with Chemonics International to develop on-line project monitoring and evaluation tools for environmental sustainability projects, as well as with the World Foundation for Environment and Development (WFED) to broker bioprospecting agreements between conservation areas and biotech companies in the U.S. and internationally.

Stefaan holds an MA with Honors in Economics from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, with a focus on developmental and environmental economics. In addition to English, Stefaan speaks Dutch, as well as some French and Spanish.

John W. Rick, Ph. D.

Dr Rick’s primary interests are prehistoric archaeology and anthropology of band-level hunter-gatherers, stone tool studies, analytical methodology, animal domestication, and South American and Southwest U.S. archaeology. His orientation has led him to archaeological fieldwork in California, Arizona, New Mexico, Illinois, France, Mexico, Peru, and Brazil. His dissertation work and most of his professional career have focused on hunter-gatherer period cave sites in high altitude regions of Peru, including the site of Chavin de Huantar.

Donovan D. Rypkema

PRESIDENT – HERITAGE STRATEGIES INTERNATIONAL

Donovan Rypkema is president of Heritage Strategies International, a firm which works at the nexus of heritage conservation and economics to provide catalytic information to public and NGO clients. Rypkema has worked with communities in 49 U.S. states and 40 countries. International clients have included the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Council of Europe, the United Nations Development Program, Europa Nostra, the European Heads of Heritage Forum, and others. Rypkema was the lead witness at a hearing of the European Parliament regarding heritage conservation and the economic crisis.

He is the author of numerous articles and publications, including Community Initiated Development, Feasibility Analysis of Historic Buildings, and a book The Economics of Historic Preservation: A Community Leader’s Guide that has been translated into Russian and Korean.  Rypkema holds a Master of Science degree in Historic Preservation from Columbia University. He is a member of the Team of Specialists in Public Private Partnerships for the UN Economic Commission for Europe, on the Board of Directors of Global Urban Development, and serves on the ICOMOS International Scientific Committee on the Economics of Conservation. Rypkema teaches a graduate course on the economics of historic preservation at the University of Pennsylvania where he received the 2008 G. Holmes Perkins Award for Distinguished Teaching.

Sarah Vaughan

Sarah Vaughan is a consultant and volunteer to archaeological and world heritage sites in the Mediterranean and Eastern Aegean region. Since the mid 1970s, Vaughan’s career focused on excavation, materials research, teaching, fundraising and senior management, working in Greece, England and the U.S. She was founding director of the Wiener Laboratory at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, a doctoral institute collaborating with over 200 U.S. colleges and universities. Vaughan holds a PhD from University College, London, in geological sciences and Aegean archaeology, with her excavation experience focused on Bronze Age, Archaic and Classical sites in Cyprus. At the Wiener Laboratory she established research programs in bioanthropology, clay, ceramic and lithic analyses, zooanthropology and faunal studies. Her materials analysis work from sites throughout Greece, Cyprus and Israel was undertaken with with a broad network of colleagues as a member of the AIA, Geological Society of America, Materials Research Society (MRS), Association for the Study of Marble and Other Stones used in Antiquity (ASMOSIA), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Society for Archaeological Sciences, and in collaboration with the National Geographic Society, the Institute for Aegean Prehistory, the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the National Science Foundation. Following her work in Greece Vaughan was appointed Honorary Senior Fellow in Geoarchaeology in the Department of Geological Sciences at Bristol University in England, before returning to the U.S. where she established a successful program of major philanthropic support and a permanent endowment for the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UC Santa Barbara.

She has organized and presented papers at major international conferences on scientific studies in archaeology in Greece, Turkey, Israel, Cyprus, France, Italy, England and the U.S. and contributed as a reviewer for Antiquity, the British Museum Press and Yale University Press. Vaughan is the author of numerous articles and publications. Her research papers have appeared in Antiquity, Journal of Roman Archaeology, Archaeomaterials, British School at Athens, Annual, American Journal of Archaeology, Materials Research Society, Issues in Art and Archaeology. She has contributed chapters to numerous scholarly books and refereed conference volumes, and was senior editor for 2 monographs of refereed papers: Aspects of Palaeodiet in the Aegean, Oxbow Books, Oxford (4/2000); Vaughan, S.J. and Kassianidou, V. 1999, The Practical Impact of Science on Field Archaeology: Maintaining Long-term Analytical Options, L.Bragiotti, Athens (5/2000)